News

CALL FOR PAPERS!

Get published in the Review that busy lawyers, judges, bar leaders, and diversity professionals turn to when they want to learn about the cutting edge diversity and inclusion issues, research, and programs in the legal profession!

The Institute for Inclusion in the Legal Profession (IILP) is seeking submissions for the 2019 edition of the IILP Review: The State of Diversity and Inclusion in the Legal Profession. The goal of the Review is to provide up-to-date, comprehensive coverage of diversity and inclusion issues, research, and strategic initiatives, in an easily accessible format for the benefit of busy practicing lawyers, judges, law students and other professionals.

The Review will be distributed to attendees at the IILP’s annual State of Diversity and Inclusion in the Legal Profession Symposia, which will be held in six to eight cities around the country. Selected authors may be invited to present their papers at one or more Symposia. The Review also will be distributed to the General Counsel of the Fortune 500 and FTSE 100, the heads of the AmLaw 200 law firms, bar association leaders, law school libraries and placement offices and made available for downloading at no cost from the IILP website.

The editors currently are seeking submissions in the following two categories:

• Feature Articles – Feature articles are substantive articles of eight to twelve pages that analyze a specific facet of diversity and inclusion in the profession, or present a summary of original research. Feature Articles are designed to be more substantive and detailed than a typical bar publication, but shorter and more accessible than a typical law review or academic article. Feature articles should be thought-provoking and address cutting-edge issues. They may be edited versions or otherwise based upon previously-published work but they must not have been previously published in their current version.

• Thought Leadership Papers – Thought leadership pieces are shorter essays that consider diversity and inclusion issues as they play out within specific segments of the legal profession, such as African Americans or associates in large law firms or leadership in bar associations. In other words, they should educate readers about “diversity within diversity.” These articles should be five to seven pages long and previously unpublished in their current version.

Submissions are due by January 31, 2018. Submissions should conform to the IILP Review Style Guide which can be found at www.TheIILP.com. Notification of acceptance and editorial comments will be provided via email. If you would like to submit a published law review or other journal article but are constrained by time and so unable to condense it, please let us know by November 1, 2017, as we can sometimes arrange to undertake this work while providing you with final content approval.

Authors of Feature Articles or Thought Leadership Articles will be required to sign a Non-Exclusive Release giving the IILP permission to print the article and affirming that it has not previously been published in its current version. They also will be asked to provide a brief biography and a color head shot photograph in a high-resolution (300 dpi or higher) PDF or other electronic format.

Submissions should be emailed to Review@TheIILP.com.

Authors are encouraged to read previous editions of the IILP Review so as to avoid duplication of topics previously covered. The previous editions of the IILP Review can be downloaded from IILP’s website at no charge.


IILP Review Call for Submissions 

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS!

Highlight noteworthy diversity and inclusion efforts for the rest of the legal profession in the “IILP Review 2016-17: The State of Diversity and Inclusion in the Legal Profession!”

If your law firm, law department, agency, bar association, or other organization has a particularly successful or innovative program or initiative, or has published a new report, or has released the results of new research you’ve undertaken that helps advance diversity and inclusion efforts in the legal profession and you think other members of the profession would benefit from knowing about it, spread the word about your efforts! IILP is now compiling its Practice Round-Up which will be included in the “IILP Review 2016-17: The State of Diversity and Inclusion in the Legal Profession” which will be published late 2016 or early 2017. The Practice Round-Up is your chance to highlight your diversity and inclusion efforts and celebrate your successes with your colleagues around the US and abroad.

Submissions should include the following:

Name of the Organization

Name of the Project, Program, Research, or Report

Purpose or Objective of the Project, Program, Research, or Report

Description and background of the Project, Program or Report

Explanation about how the Project or Program operates or the methodology of the Research or Report

How many lawyers, law students, judges, students, etc. were/are involved?

What kind of costs did the Project, Program, Research or Report require?

What was the source of funding?

Does the Project, Program, Research or Report require paid staff? If so, how many and for how much time?

What have been the benefits of this Project, Program, Research, or Report?

What obstacles might someone trying to replicate this reasonably expect to encounter?

If replication might not be ideal, are there other ways that individuals or organizations in other parts of the country can support, participate in, or help expand the program into other geographic locations?

Who is the contact person for someone interested in learning more about this? (Please provide a name, telephone number and email address.)

Submissions are due by March 1, 2016. Submissions should be emailed to Review@TheIILP.com


CLE in Switzerland

The Institute for Inclusion in the Legal Profession is pleased to announce that it will be co-hosting a program about the state of diversity and inclusion in the global legal profession with the Chicago Bar Association in Lausanne, Switzerland, from March 29-30th. For more information about this exciting program, download the attachment below. To register, visit http://www.chicagobar.org/am/newsfiles/files/439_Switzerland2016RegistrationForm.pdf.

Switzerland2016RegistrationForm.pdf

IILP Washington, DC Symposium

The Institute for Inclusion in the Legal Profession is pleased to announce its upcoming symposium in Washington, D.C.

Washington DC Press Release

IILP Chicago Symposium

The Institute for Inclusion in the Legal Profession is pleased to announce its upcoming symposium in Chicago at Jenner & Block LLP on Wednesday, October 14th. For more details about symposium speakers and panelists, please see the press release below.

Chicago Press Release

IILP Los Angeles Symposium

The Institute for Inclusion in the Legal Profession is pleased to announce its upcoming symposium in Los Angeles at Sidley Austin, on Thursday, September 24th. For more details about symposium speakers and panelists, please see the press release below.

Los Angeles Press Release


IILP Seattle Symposium

The Institute for Inclusion in the Legal Profession is pleased to announce its upcoming symposium in Seattle at Starbucks on Friday, September 18th. For more details about symposium speakers and panelists, please see the press release below.

Seattle Press Release


01 Sep 2011 10:16 AM | Sandra Yamate
IILP released its inaugural review, "IILP Review: The State of Diversity and Inclusion in the Legal Profession" today. The IILP Review features current data and statistics about diversity in the legal profession, articles exploring the diversity within diversity and inclusion, and a "Diversity in Practice" round-up of programs, strategies and other efforts from around the country that are showing promising results in fostering a more diverse and inclusive profession.

IILP Review 2014 Press Release


Interview with IILP Board Member Floyd Holloway, Jr.

Esquire Coaching interview board member Floyd Holloway, Jr. on their Radio Show last week. Mr. Holloway talked about IILP and broader diversity and inclusion efforts within the legal profession. To listen to the interview, click here


IILP Signs Consortium for Advancing Women Lawyers letter on MDL Standards

IILP is pleased to be a signatory to a letter from the Consortium for Advancing Women Lawyers urging amendments to MDL Standards and Best Practices to include specific guidance to promote diversity in court appointments. 

Read the full letter here: MDL Standards Letter.pdf

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  • 18 Apr 2011 1:00 PM | Sandra Yamate (Administrator)

    April 18, 2011
    By  Jerry Crimmins
    Law Bulletin staff writer

    A retired Illinois Appellate Court justice who now works to improve black political representation as well as a founder of the Puerto Rican Bar Association are among six winners of the "2011 Vanguard Awards."

    The "Vanguard Awards" are presented every year "to honor lawyers and judges who, through their efforts, have made law and the legal profession more accessible to and reflective of the community at large."

    The six honorees will receive their awards Wednesday in an event at the Standard Club, 320 S. Plymouth Court, with a reception at 11:30 a.m. and a luncheon at noon.

    The awards are presented by the Asian American Bar Association of the Greater Chicago Area, the Chicago Bar Association, the Cook County Bar Association, the Hispanic Lawyers Association of Illinois, the Lesbian and Gay Bar Association of Chicago and the Puerto Rican Bar Association of Illinois.

    Those to be honored this year are:

    • Judge Manuel Barbosa of U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Western Division of the Northern District of Illinois, chosen by the Hispanic Lawyers Association of Illinois;
    • William Cousins Jr., a retired justice of the Illinois Appellate Court, chosen by the Cook County Bar Association;
    • Selma C. D'Souza, legislative director of the Illinois Department of Healthcare and Family Services, chosen by the Asian American Bar Association of the Greater Chicago Area;
    • Marc S. Firestone, general counsel of Kraft Foods Inc., who was chosen by the Chicago Bar Association;
    • Edwin Reyes of Briskman, Briskman & Greenberg, who was chosen by the Puerto Rican Bar Association of Illinois;
    • Laura M. Ricketts, board member of the Chicago Cubs and chairwoman of Chicago Cubs Charities, who was chosen by the Lesbian and Gay Bar Association of Chicago.

    As examples, some activities of three of the winners are described below.

    Cousins is a board member of the Cook County Bar Association, currently also works with the South Side branch of the NAACP, and works with the ad hoc group, African-Americans for Legislative Redistricting.

    This is according to Lawrence N. Hill, president of the CCBA, who is a member of the ad hoc group on legislative redistricting with Cousins.

    Hill said Cousins in his career has also helped Operation PUSH and the Chicago Planned Parenthood Association.

    Cousins' contributions to diversity "go back decades," Hill said.

    Cousins began his legal career in 1953 after service with the Army in the Korean War. He has been an attorney in private practice, a Cook County prosecutor, also 8th Ward alderman for 9½ years, and later a Cook County Circuit Court judge and finally an Illinois Appellate Court justice.

    Another award winner, Reyes, "has been a leader in the struggle for diversity in the legal profession for years," said Charles P. Romaker, president of the Puerto Rican Bar Association (PRBA).

    Reyes was one of the founders of the PRBA and is now treasurer of the group.

    Reyes "has raised thousands of dollars for Latino law students" through the Latino Law Student Scholarships Program, according to the award announcement.

    He also is active in the PRBA's Adopt-A-Family program which gives food and gifts to families in need over the holiday season and he has participated in Lawyers in the Classroom for the PRBA.

    Reyes is a member of several bar associations and is currently under-secretary of the Hispanic National Bar Association.

    "He is a very energetic, high energy guy and he maintains a very active practice, as well," Romaker said.

    Another award winner, Firestone "is a leader in the truest sense of the word. He never hesitates to contribute in whatever way he can to advocate for increased diversity and inclusion in our profession," said Sandra S. Yamate, chief executive officer of the Institute for Inclusion in the Legal Profession.

    Yamate said Firestone is head of the board of her institute and "doesn't just say he's interested in improving diversity in the legal profession, he makes the time to do it."

    "He thinks about and he ponders what can we actually do to affect change and then he considers what strategies can be implemented to do it," Yamate said.

    "He takes time to be accessible to diverse lawyers. … Young women and minority associates tell me how they met him once, struck up a conversation and maybe a few months later, he happens to be in their town. He contacts them for coffee to get a handle on how things are going in their careers, what's really happening, how they are being treated by their employers.

    "I don't know any other person of his stature who does things like that," Yamate said.
  • 12 Apr 2011 10:30 AM | Sandra Yamate (Administrator)

    Release:           Immediate

    Contact:           Sandra Yamate or Deborah Weixl

    Phone:             312/628-5885

    E-Mail:             news@theiilp.com 

    Online:             http://theiilp.com

    RESULTS OF NEW STUDY SHOW THE LEGAL PROFESSION IS FALLING SHORT IN EFFORT TO INCREASE DIVERSITY

    Despite a strong business case for diversity, inclusion continues to lag

    CHICAGO, April 12, 2011 – Is the business case for diversity making a difference in how corporate legal work is being assigned to outside counsel? Are there meaningful incentives in place to foster diversity and inclusion? Are law firms finding value in building a diverse workplace? Are there real opportunities for diverse lawyers? Why has the legal profession lagged behind in achieving true diversity and what steps can it take to make inclusion a reality?

     

    New data resulting from a large study of corporations, law firms and diverse partners in law firms by the Institute for Inclusion in the Legal Profession suggest that there is still a long way to go to make the legal profession inclusive through the full integration of diverse lawyers and law firms into the corporate legal marketplace. The report shows that while a business case for diversity has been in place for more than 20 years, it falls short of providing an environment for achieving the economic and social results that reflect career sustainability, viability and success for meaningful numbers of diverse lawyers.

     

    “The profession has sought solutions and increasingly focused on diversity and inclusion, and it is important to acknowledge that we have made much progress. Equally important, however, is the fact that we must acknowledge that there is a measurable level of frustration, and even skepticism, about the pace –  and the possibility – of significant change in key areas of measurement,” said Marc S. Firestone, chair of IILP and executive vice president, corporate and legal affairs, and general counsel, Kraft Foods, Inc. “Our findings show that diverse lawyers are disappointed with progress and law firms are finding that their diversity efforts are not a clear priority when dealing with corporate clients.”

  • 05 Aug 2010 11:00 AM | Sandra Yamate (Administrator)

    July 30, 2010 Volume: 156 Issue: 148
    Institute seeks answers to firm diversity issues

    By Maria Kantzavelos
    Law Bulletin staff writer

    If you lead a corporation's law department, what percentage of your legal spend last year went to racial and ethnic minorities who were leading matters for you in large law firms?

    If you're a member of your law firm's management, about what percentage of your firm's gross revenues were received from clients who ask about the diversity of your lawyers or your diversity efforts?

    If you're a partner in a law firm, what is your racial or ethnic background? Have you personally received any business from corporations that have expressed their commitment to or preference for diversity among their outside counsel?

    The newly formed, Chicago-based Institute for Inclusion in the Legal Profession is seeking answers to these questions, and more, as part of a study launched Friday that aims to weigh the answer to a bigger question: Is the business case for diversity within the legal profession working?

    The Business Case for Diversity study involves a three-pronged, online survey of the attitudes and practices of general counsels, law firm management and partners at law firms.

    "We know that the business case for diversity is something that's been talked about and addressed, and people have worked on it very hard, for a couple of decades," said Sandra S. Yamate, the institute's CEO. "And yet, for some reason, we're still not seeing the kinds of progress that one would expect."

    The definition of the so-called business case for diversity, Yamate said, is: "The notion that clients value diversity and therefore are finding ways to include that value in any determinations of the qualifications of lawyers to do their work - that it makes for good business for them."

    The three versions of the survey, available online through Dec. 31, asks questions about how corporations choose to allocate their budget for diverse outside counsel; how law firm management determines whether there is any correlation between a firm's diversity efforts and business generation; and about the actual revenue amounts generated from corporate clients by law firm partners who are women, racial or ethnic minorities, lesbians, gays, bisexuals or transsexuals, or partners who are disabled.

    The institute hopes to explore whether the business case for diversity is working in its current form and, "if it's not working, why not? And then, how can we fix it if it's not working?" Yamate said.

    "If you have corporate clients saying: 'The problem is, we want diverse outside counsel and yet the law firms are not giving us the kind of diversity we want,' and the law firms say: 'We're trying our best, but even when we do have diverse lawyers we're not necessarily seeing more business as a result of that,' and then the diverse lawyers are saying: 'We're bringing this diversity but we don't necessarily see clients giving us more work,' it becomes a conundrum in terms of why doesn't it work," Yamate said.

    She said the study is unique in that it will attempt to measure how much clients are actually spending on diversity in law firms, how much business law firms feel they can attribute to diversity, and how much business diverse lawyers are actually seeing.

    "Rather than just relying on all the anecdotes, we're hoping that this study is going to allow us to actually get some data on what's happening," Yamate said.

    The institute was launched in June with a mission to address the lack of diversity in the legal profession in a more comprehensive way, said Yamate, a founder. The organization, which is based at the headquarters of the Chicago Bar Association, 321 S. Plymouth Court, is comprised of lawyers and judges from Illinois and around the country.

    "We are not specifically targeting a particular gender or racial group, we are not targeting a particular practice area. We're really trying to look at the entire profession in a comprehensive fashion," Yamate said.

    Marc S. Firestone, general counsel at Kraft Foods North America Inc., serves as the institute's chairman.

    In a written statement, Firestone commented on the purpose of the study launched by the institute on Friday.

    "Corporations and law firms don't yet have a shared commitment to diversity. Sometimes the clients put too much of the burden on the firms and sometimes the firms question the sincerity of their clients. And it's far from clear that both see eye-to-eye on the mutual business benefits from inclusiveness," Firestone said in the statement. "This study should provide deeper, and perhaps novel, insights into these and other critical aspects of the effort to increase diversity in the profession."

    The use of the word "inclusion" in the institute's name is significant, Yamate said.

    "That's because we want to make sure our approach in our mission includes everybody," Yamate said. "So that straight white men have a role in the work we're doing as much as anyone else. With the institute, we want to make sure they understand they are part of the profession and have a role to play in trying to enhance the diversity of the profession."

    More information about the organization can be found at www.theiilp.com.

    The survey is available for participation at the following online addresses.

    *For corporations, www.surveymonkey.com/s/HL7Z95D;

    *For law firm management, www.surveymonkey.com/s/HL2WM5P;

    *For law firm partners who are either women, or racial or ethnic minorities, LGBT, or disabled, www.surveymonkey.com/s/HLXLVCL.

    The results of the survey and an analysis of the study is expected to be released in Fall 2011.

    mkantzavelos@lbpc.com

  • 30 Jul 2010 12:30 PM | Sandra Yamate (Administrator)
    The Institute for Inclusion in the Legal Profession (“IILP”), a new organization dedicated to increasing diversity and inclusion within the legal profession, today announced an initiative to assess whether the business case for diversity is having its intended impact, and if it is not, why not. The Business Case for Diversity study, which will begin July 30, 2010, will survey the attitudes and practices of hundreds of general counsels, law firm management and partners at U.S. law firms.

    Click here to read the press release
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